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Thread: Sticking Norvel .049

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  1. Sticking Norvel .049 
    #1
    Join Date
    05-18-2012
    Location
    Andover, Mn, USA
    Posts
    2
    Hello,

    My first Norvel .049 and it does not flip over, and it's new. It has no cylinder to piston clearance near the top of the stroke (glow plug removed so there is no compression). If I remove the cylinder screws and rotate the crank with lite pressure on top, the cylinder will rise about 1/16" at the top of the stroke. It's been cleaned and oiled. Heating it up helps a bit but is not typical in my experience. It will turn over cold but feels forced.

    This motor came from a garage sale. Mounted in a new Herr Piper Cherokee with a new JR Quattro and a reciept dated 2002. Everything was put together but not flow. I couldn't pass it up for $50 and was mainly after the motor. Was told it was not run and it looked it.

    Thanks,
    Pat
     

  2.  
    #2
    The Norvel is an "ABC" construction engine. These have a tapered cylinder and it should be tight at the top when cold.

    To free up a stuck engine soak in antifreeze rated for aluminum block engines. Heat to 150 F to 190F in a crock pot or similar for several hours. This will dissolve any varnish or congealed fuel. It helps to remove the backplate or otherwise open up the crankcase so the antifreeze can get inside easier.
    Do not use a crock pot that has had antifreeze in it for cooking. I bought one at a garage sale for $5 and have it dedicated to soaking/cleaning engines.

    Rinse off the antifreeze and then lubricate the engine with ATF transmission fluid. Wipe down the engine with a rag that has some ATF transmission fluid on it to displace any water that remains and protect from rust/corrosion.

    THEN try turning the engine over again.

    If its still stuck it has to be fully disassembled and probably needs new bearings. (very rare for a bushing bearing engine to not free up... and replacing the bushing is not fun.)

    This will make the engine look as close to shiney new as possible
     

  3.  
    #3
    Join Date
    08-19-2002
    Location
    Wichita, ks
    Posts
    27
    Sounds normal to me...

    Most glow engines are extremely tight near TDC. Some more than others. My first r/c car engine, I tried to return to the shop because it had so much "click" as I called it at the top of the stroke.

    Some of the newer engines won't hardly even turn over they're so tight. Usually I end up heating new engines up to ~200F (90-100C) before trying to start them. Makes the first bit of runtime a little easier on internal parts and saves the headache of trying to warm it up so it actually functions properly.

    If it's never been run or had fuel through it, I don't know why the whole cleaning/oiling procedure would be required. I would just get it hot and fire it up.

    Good advice with the antifreeze on a stuck, gummy engine! Hopefully the new engine won't need that extensive of a cleaning though.

    -Eric
     

  4.  
    #4
    Join Date
    05-18-2012
    Location
    Andover, Mn, USA
    Posts
    2
    After entering the correct keywords into Google I found plenty of information about this. Your feedback helped me get the terminology closer. I now realize that it's normal for ABC engines. This is my first so it threw me a bit.

    Thanks for the input!

    Pat
     

  5.  
    #5
    Join Date
    08-19-2002
    Location
    Wichita, ks
    Posts
    27
    Good! Keep us updated when you get it fired up.

    -Eric
     

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