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Thread: Teaming up with "Mr. Gee Bee," Henry Haffke

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  1.  
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    now that the exit covers are in place, I can start on the attachment fairing for the windscreen. This is one of the easier scale details to reproduce. All you need is tape, flexible vinyl tape, a thick epoxy (I use JB-Weld) and some scrap mixing sticks and a spreader with rounded corner edges. An old cd case makes a good mixing pallet
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  2.  
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    First clean off all the surfaces including the winscreen with either denatured alcohol or even white vinager. This cuts any grease or oil to make a good bond. Then add the flexible vinyl around the to base of the windscreen. After that tape the area further with regular tape to prevent the filler epoxy from getting on unwanted areas.
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  3.  
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    Mix the filler epoxy and then use a spreading stick to apply an even bead around the exposed section between the two strips of vinyl tape. I like using JB-Weld because it is extremely thick so it doesn't sag after the fairing is formed. Also since it is a metal filled epoxy, it makes a very strong support for the windscreen. It won't crack or chip after a lot of wear and tear.
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  4.  
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    After the epoxy has been applied, use the rounded spreader stick to smooth the epoxy and form the fillet. Take your time and get an even, smooth fillet. Once you have the fillet formed, wet your fingers and smooth the filler down so it has a fine edge formed over the tape. Let the epoxy set for about a half hour then carefull peel away the tape. Be careful not to touch the fillet with the tape while removing it. You can clean away any smudges of epoxy now with some alcohol and a paper towel, again being careful not to touch the epoxy.
    Now let cure overnight.
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  5.  
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    The next step is to layout the screw locations. This is important as uneven spacing is quickly noticed while even, neat spacing goes unnoticed. I used a simple piece of paper to measure off the spacing with the front screw centered on the hatch cover
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  6.  
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    Once you have the screw positions worked out, use the pin vise to drill all the holes.
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  7.  
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    Here's the finished screw installation. All that's left is to mask off the winscreen and to paint the fairing strip to match the white paint job of the Howard Ike.
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  8.  
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    oops here the photo
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  9.  
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    Get out the tape and start covering everything except the fairing fillet. Since the color is dark, the fairing will first need a white primer added before the white paint can be applied
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  10.  
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    Here the primer has been applied
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  11.  
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    When you remove the tape you have a nicely primed fairing. the next thing is to use alchol and clean off all the tape residure and then tape the windscreen only again, then prepare to coat the entire hatch cover and the fairing strip with one last even coat of white
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  12.  
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    So here it is in place on the Ike. Looks pretty good.
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  13.  
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    Here a shot looking from the top into the cockpit opening toward the instrument panel. This really was a small aircraft and the pilot's head would fill the cockpit opening. Not much to see but the next pylon!
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  14.  
    Gerryy, this is some outstanding work, you make it look so easy. I myself need to stop and regroup and look at my ability's form time to time, I sometimes rush things and I need to slow down some. I have learned so much from you by following this thread. Thanks so much for sharing.
     

  15.  
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    Wired, thanks for leaving a comment! It has been so long since anyone commented that I wondered if anyone was looking... :^)
    I appreciate your kind words. The reason I like doing these build-alongs is to share some techniques that there just isn't room for in the magazines. Once in a while a technique can be photgraphed for a "How To" article, but when you build a scale model, you can't always stop to take studio photos. So these shop pix are the next best thing.

    Many of the techniques I use I have learned from other much better scale builders than me. I try to simplify them and use them on my models!

    But anyway, thanks again for your comments!
    Cheers,
    GY
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  16.  
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    Here are some photos of a Replica Howard Ike I found while surfing on the web. Tonight I will be finishing the dummy exhaust pipes and I will post some more pix then. Also, I just got the new clear coat from my Buddy Chip Mull at Scale Stits. This is a high gloss clear that forumlated to work with the rest of the PolyTone paint line so there is no problems with compatibility.
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  17.  
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    more details! Wish I had these a few months ago!
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  18.  
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    I started on the dummy exhaust pipes last night. Basically they are 1/4 inch long sections of a 7/8-inch diamter aluminum tube. I used an old Nova Rossi tuned pipe manifold because it has a rough cast look on the outside surface that will be perfect for dry brushing on the colors of the finished exhaust pipes.
    The first thing I did was to measure out the pattern on the side of the engine cowling. I then made a template with my CAD program and printed it out so I could use it as a guide to draw on the 1 inch diameter openings on the cowl. I used a pencil compass.
    I then used a small Robart grinding bit to cut away the outer suface of the cowling. (this killed me after sorking so hard to make the cowl smooth and even. After removing most of the material to a dpeth of about 1/8 inch, I swiitched to a sanding drum to smooth the edges of the openings and make them perfectly round.

    Later the long cooling tunnel in the bottom of the cowl section will be covered with a cover panel with smaller openings cut into it. It will be screwed into place and painted to match the rest of the cowling.
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  19.  
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    All the exposed wood was then sealed with epoxy resin and allowed to cure. I then applied a thin bead of JB-Weld to the inside edges of each exhaust pipe section and centered it in the opening. I used the handle of an X-Acto knife to smooth the JBW into an even fillet to bond the tube in place. Once the epoxy is smoothed out I hold the sections of tubes in place with some tape until the epoxy cures.
    Tonight and during the weekend I will be priming and painting this section of the cowl again and then will add rivet and panel detail as well as painting the pipes black with a little brown and blue thrown in to show the affects of hot exhaust.You can also see that only half of the first exhaust pipe is bonded to the cowling side. The front half of the opening is cut into the nose section of the cowl. It is seperate from the pipe, and the back ground area will simply be painted black

    The fine pencil line is where I will form a panel line and add the rivet details
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  20.  
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    Here are the finished installed exhaust pipes. All that I need to do now is to paint them when I add all the other details. So on to the tail wires.
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  21.  
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    To make the tail stiffening wires I use Du-Bro steel landing gear straps and Nelson Hobby Supply scale clevis ends. I used 1/16" welding rod for the wires them selves
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  22.  
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    I used stainless steel 4-40 hex-head bolts to attach the straps and then attached the clevises to the wire with threaded brass couplers soldered to the ends of the wire. One coupler is used and the clevis is soldered directly to the other end of the wire
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  23.  
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    The clevises are attached to the straps with a lock pin and a cotter pin. Here the four wires are in place. Once the rest of the model is ready for details to be painted I will remove the wires and straps and then they will be painted white
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  24.  
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    I spent a little time on the cockpit detailing today. Like I tell most of my friends, the details are not meant to be historically accurate, but it is suppose to have the flavor of the 1920s or 30s. So I looked for some cloth ribbon that would look the part of wide aviation straps and seat belts. I found the Offray brand at the local fabric shop as well as some really nice craft mini-buckles from the scrapbook section. You can check out the ribbon at www.offray.com
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  25.  
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    I looked online for various aircraft buckles and shoulder straps and I made mine to be a loose representation of the older vintage one from WW 2 aircraft. Basically the shoulder straps have wide vertical blades that clipped onto the seatbelt webs. For the buckle blades and the strap ends, I used 1/32 inch plywood covered with aluminum heating duct tape. The same tape I use to represent panels and hinge straps.
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